Educators & Students

Access Complimentary Educational Resources

The ACR Lupus Initiative (TLI) offers the complimentary lupus educational resources listed below to medical and health professional schools in an effort to help increase the number of health care providers who are knowledgeable about diagnosing and treating lupus.

Our complimentary educational resources include:

  • PowerPoints—designed to be easily incorporated into medical school lectures on a variety of topics;
  • Interactive case studies—offer medical education simulation aimed to teach students to apply clinical reasoning in the diagnosis of lupus;
  • Traditional case studies—provide examples of how lupus presents among a range of ages and races/ethnicities in a variety of cultural settings;
  • Short teaching videos—provide a unique opportunity to learn about lupus from experts and hear directly from lupus patients.

The resources are also appropriate for teaching more general concepts such as health disparities, management of chronic disease, cultural competence and coordination of care.

If you are an educator at a medical or health profession school who is interested in reviewing our complimentary educational resources and considering them for use in your teachings, Please complete the short form below to gain access to our resources and teaching tools.  You will receive an email to the address you provide in this form with an access web link that houses our full library of resources and teaching tools.





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Privacy: The information you are providing will not be shared with any 3rd parties. This information will only be used for our tracking purposes and potential email communications from the Lupus Initiative to you. You can send us an email via our contact form at any time to have your information removed from our database.

American College of Rheumatology’s dissemination of complimentary lupus educational resources was supported by the Grant or Cooperative Agreement Number, 6 NU58 DP006138, funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent official views of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or the Department of Health and Human Services.

Please let us know if you have any questions and/or consider utilizing the resources below into your teachings by contacting Stacey Boyd at sboyd@rheumatology.org, or (404) 633-3777 x804.